Hair Styling · Roller Setting

Roller Setting Language for Diagrams & Schemas

Greeting and Salutations!!! I send peace and blessings out to all of the awesome readers of this blog!

As I scoured the internet on roller setting ideas and techniques, I found that there was inconsistent language, very few actual diagrams, and lots of conceptual murkiness about this form of hair styling. I am writing this post today to clarify the language in my posts in order to have a clearer understanding of roller setting and create some diagrams with schemas to represent rollersetting patterns. This way we can all “speak” the same language here, and then be able to describe what we want our hair to look like to stylists and kitchen beauticians alike. 
I also thought this was important since I plan on creating new roller setting diagrams each week, so this will be the goto section to describe what the corresponding acronyms mean and how they will affect the outcome of the roller set. 

Section A: Rolling Results

Now let’s come up with some standard language for hair rolling. 
Rolling the ends of the hair over the roller and on base will produce lift at the roots (OL
This is the standard way of rolling the hair. 
Rolling the ends of the hair over the roller and half off base will produce some lift at the roots (OS).
Rolling the ends of the hair over and off base will produce flat roots (OF).
Rolling the ends of the hair under the roller will produce flat roots (UF)  
This is also known as an indentation roller set. 

Section B: Desired Curl Pattern Results  

To create curls when using rollers the hair should be wound around the roller more than  2 1/2 times. 
To create waves when using rollers the hair should be wound around the roller 1/1/2 times.
To create a C-shaped curl when using rollers the hair should be wound around the roller 1 time.

Section C: Rollers

Avocado Green (A) – 3 inch 
Black (B)- 2.5 inch 
Grey (G)- 2 inch 
Purple (P)- 1.75 inch
Red (R)- 1.5 inch 
Green (G)- 1.25 inch 
Orange (O)-1 inch 
Yellow (Y)- .75 inch 
Tangerine (T)-.5 inch 
Navy Blue (N)-.25 inch  

Section D: Roller Setting Patterns 

Mohawk roller setting pattern- One middle row down the center of the head with two corresponding left and right parts. The number of rollers per row may vary depending on diameter of the roller. The smaller roller the diameter is the more rollers you will need, and vise versa the larger the roller diameter size is the less rollers you will need.      

Ex.1: the pattern below was created for Orange rollers.   
C1       C2       C3       C4       C5
O         O         O         O         O
O         O         O         O         O
O         O         O         O         O
            O         O         O
            O         O         O
                        O
                        O

Ex.2: here’s an example of a roller pattern that indicated the types of rollers used (see section C for the abbreviation codes):

C1      C2       C3       C4      C5

A         A         G         A        A
B         A         B         A        B
            B         A         B        
                        A        

NB- there are fewer rollers in each column since these are the largest rollers in diameter. 

                                
Ex.3: here is an example of a mohawk roller setting pattern that indicates the types of rollers (G- Grey)  and the rolling results (UF- Under Flat) or (OL- Over Lift) to increase the complexity of your roller design: 
C1       C2      C3       C4       C5
GUF   GUF   GUF    GUF   GUF
GUF   GUF   GUF    GUF   GUF
GUF   GOL   GUF   GOL   GUF
           GOL   GOL   GOL
           GOL   GOL   GOL  
                      GOL  
                      GOL

Ex.4: here is an example of a brick layered rolling setting pattern that shows the types of rollers and the rolling results: 

R1                  GUF   GUF   GUF  
R2             GUF   GUF   GUF   GUF  
R3           GUF  GUF  GUF  GUF  GUF
R4             GUF   GUF   GUF   GUF
R5                   GUF   GUF   GUF  
R6                         GUF   GUF
This is by no means an exhaustive list of roller setting patterns and designs, but will serve as a way to orient and guide this blog’s discussion on roller setting patterns.
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